Sebastiaan Bremer @ Hales Gallery

This evening I had the delight and pleasure of viewing a new collection of work from Dutch artist Sebastiaan Bremer, even managing to share thoughts with him on gentrification and timeless nature of emotion. 

Bremer’s work draws, literally and figuratively, on sentimental images from his timeline and family tree. The creme-cord suit wearing interdisciplinary artist adds blemishes to nostalgic photos by hand. He subsequently creates spiraling, painted embellishments – a prominent ulterior skin akin to acrylic psoriasis. In this exhibit, Egmont Revisited, photographs of his children, his father as a child and himself as an adolescent are displayed chronologically mapped out across the acoustically-marred Hales gallery space. 

The predominately black impasto dots are intricate and fuxuous, giving the doctored images an illusion of movement. Momentary rictus is emphasised through a congestion of spots around the brow, glimmers of happiness are eruptions around the crown petering off into random dots of colour. Sebastiaan shared that the colour on the peripheral of the pieces connoted that whilst the specific emotion captured in black and white is ephemeral, the colour acts as a supersession of stagnant frames into a whirring, present  day familiarity.  

Personal favourites from the latest collections are the pieces that are only partial photos with trails and wisps of modification, adding an entrancing propulsion to the static pictures. The fine detail and meticulous effort placed into the compositions conveys an astonishing amount of focus. The dilution of calm pictures with pulsating paints results in poignant pieces eliciting transfixed gazes.  

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